SQL Server: Recovering operations after a disaster

Datacenters disappear. Not often, but it happens. Hurricane Sandy in 2012 swallowed whole datacenters in Lower Manhattan. Hurricanes Irma and Maria wiped out virtually all the datacenters in Puerto Rico in 2017. Cloud datacenters are not immune, either. The Azure Central Region outage of 2018 occurred after a lightning strike queued up a sequence of automated responses that failed in a spectacularly Rube Goldberg-like manner and proceeded to take multiple Azure availability zones offline for the better part of a day.

Sometimes it’s possible to anticipate the arrival of a disaster; other times, the disaster arrives without warning. Either way, the production infrastructure your organization depends on is going to be offline for some time. That does not, however, mean that your operations must go offline. It means that you need to have a disaster recovery (DR) plan in place that can provide an alternative means of keeping your operations running when your primary infrastructure is out of commission.


Recent News & Press

How will high availability develop in 2023?

Cassius Rhue, VP of Customer Experience, SIOS Technology, predicts the following major trends in high availability and related areas. 2022 continued the pace of uncertainty […]

Read More

SIOS Reveals Technology Predictions for 2023

From Data Democratization to New Requirements for Disaster Recovery and High Availability Protection – Here Are Some of the Biggest Trends SAN MATEO, CA – […]

Read More

Disaster Recovery: Avoiding What You Don’t See Coming

Nobody anticipated that all the data centers in lower Manhattan would go offline before Super Storm Sandy hit in 2012. But they were—and it was […]

Read More